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  1. So this is a project 13 years in the waiting ... but I finally took to it this past week. At purchase, my car had a perfect rear cargo cover, which I was excited about b/c in all the other Quest sI had owned they were damaged. It was short-lived, b/c one month later a tree fell on my car, crushing the roof, hatch, ... and busting up my rear cargo cover. Well, that was 13 years ago already, so here's how I finally rebuilt it: Obviously remove the cover. You can see where the branches of the tree punctured the cover. I'm only repairing the lower section, but these steps could apply to rebuilding the whole thing if you needed to replace the fiberboard on the top section too. I started by peeling back the carpet on the left and right sides. Next, I flipped the cover over and peeled the carpet back. Oh look, all these years later still finding glass from the tree incident .... lol. Next, you'll need to drill out the rivets on the black hinge with a 3/16" bit. Once all the rivets are drilled out you'll have the hinge free. It still won't be free just yet though. Flip the cover back over and you'll find there's a material strip stapled to the cover. Grab your needle nose and pull the staples. Then the fiberboard material will finally be free. I had a scrap piece of 1/8 inch masonite laying around from a home project. It was just big enough to use a replacement piece. I simply used a sharpie and traced the outline on the masonite. These piece had some spray paint on it from other project, but I didn't care b/c I was going to be painting it black anyway. Next, use the hinge and mark the holes for the rivets. Not shown, but next I drill the holes and cut it out the shape on a bandsaw. I used some sandpaper on the edges quick just to smooth it over, but I didn't go crazy b/c there's no exposed edges of material, it's all covered by carpet. Now I threw some paint on. I quickly realized the black on the underside of the top section was not going to match anymore, so I tossed a coat of fresh black on the underside of that too so it all looked uniform. Now it's time to go back the other way. To reattach the carpet I purchased some Gorilla spray adhesive. I've also used 3M Super 77 for projects like this, and that works really well too, FYI. Don't start spraying things just yet though .... BEFORE you spray adhesive the carpet and put the board back on, you need to put screws through the holes you drilled b/c you won't be able to access them once it's adhered to the carpet. I just used simple machine screws to replace the rivets. Flip it over carefully so your screws don't fall out. Once you do that, spray the board and the back of the carpet and let it dry for a few seconds before putting it down. I quickly dropped on washers and loosely threaded nuts on the screws. Once the carpet is adhered well you can flip it upside down again and roll the remaining edges over. Spray everything down with adhesive and it'll stick nice. Lastly, re-attach the rubber gasket on the rear edge. It just presses on. Here it is re-installed in the car. Much better. Good luck. It's a pretty easy little project. You can do it.
    6 points
  2. I always got projects going on .. winter and every other season in between ... 😁 Some of you who have been around for a while will remember StarquestJoe, I purchased a Galant VR4 he had sitting in his backyard after a few years of asking him about it. My son was 10 at the time, and my thought was if we started restoration on it we could maybe be done by the time he was 16. So we have been working on that for the past 3 years. So far, most of the work has been just building the motor. We had to tear everything down, send it all out to be machined and cleaned and then put everything back together. In the meantime, the car has been in storage at my father-in-laws shop. At this point the motor is pretty much finished ready to go, so it's time to bring the physical car home and start working that. I want to go over the brakes, suspension and drop the gas tank and see what's going on there. That will be our winter project. To get started though I have to find a storage place to keep my Eclipse. I have a few leads on some garages, but it's been tough between work and weather to get the car dropped off and in storage. I have a 3 car garage, but I need to get rid of one car in order to bring his home and begin work on it. I hate to send the Starion out of my sight since I have so much into it, so Eclipse is the winter storage candidate. I've never stored a car before, and I'm finding it out it's not cheap. I have a fully detailed thread going on on DSM Tuners of the VR4 resto you can click through when you're bored here: Galant VR4 Restoration Here's a few pics though just to give you the idea. Thus far, I've enjoyed this project more than any other I've done in the last 25 years. Teaching my son and watching become passionate about the hobby and have his ideas and dreams has been really cool. This is what we started with. Supposedly Joe got this 4G63 from StarquestRescue, another name many of you will remember well. This a picture of the car the day after we picked it up and brought it back to the shop. The car itself has been and had been sitting for a while, so if it doesn't work out we can always buy a 1G, 2G or even another VR4 and drop our engine in. So we have options. It been a long road so far and the Eclipse and Station don't get as much attention right now, but this hopefully will worth it in the end.
    4 points
  3. "TURBO" Door handles are tough to find, and they are tougher to find in decent shape. If you like the look, and want the look, here's a cheap and easy way to create it. First, start by removing your door handles. I won't go over how to do that here, but there are posts you can find. I'll try to link one up later. Next, you'll need a set of the "TURBO" stickers. They are available on eBay, or, you can have your own made. I had a graphic artist friend make these for me. I think the ones on eBay are about $5. If you've ever seen a "real" set of turbo handles, they are perfectly smooth. Conversely, the "standard" handles are textured. They have what I call a knurling on them. You need to carefully sand that off smooth. I used my palm sander and rotated through 150, 220 and some 400 by hand. When you're done, it should look like this. Once you are this far the "black" on the handles will be kinda dull and flat looking. We need to bring that back to a shine to have a look correct. For this I grabbed some buffing compound and a buffing wheel. After some polishing you should be able to get the handles to look like this. Now we can sticker them up. Do some measuring and get everything centered up. Peel back the covering ... and ... ta-da! $5 TURBO door handles. Last thing I did to these that I didn't show was a took a can of clear spray paint and just gave them a light coating a day later to help prevent the stickers from peeling up.
    4 points
  4. I sent Ryddler a message and asked him to update the home screen. Jimmy
    4 points
  5. I'm actually restoring a Galant VR4 right now with my son. We're about 2 years in.
    4 points
  6. At the end of the last driving season, I noticed my antenna wasn't retracting all the way, so I figured it's time to dig in and see if we can fix this thing. First, you'll need to remove a few carpet panels in the rear trunk area. Once they are out of your way, you need to remove two nuts. The second one is under the rear deck support sheet metal. To get it out, you'll have to drop it down into the rear fender and snake the antenna part out first, It's a little tricky, but with some finagling you'll be able to sneak it out. Don't forget to remove the ground screw just below the upper nut too. Once you get it on your bench you can pop the on side off and you'll see all the gearing. On the other half you'll see the electrical connections. You can see there are contacts that ride on the metal surface as the gears spin. Clean up and re-lube the electrical side up with dielectric grease. That's all you need to do to that side. While you're at it, grab some White Lithium Grease too. If you don't have any make a trip to your local Auto Store. Give all the plastic gear a good cleaning, get all the dried up gunk off and re-coat everything with the White Lithium Grease. Next, flip the whole unit over and we'll move over to the mast. There is a plastic housing that has the retract tape inside. It's coiled in there like a snake in a can. Pop it off and will sorta burst out. Mine was nasty. It takes some time, but clean the tape entirely. I used Simple Green. Then re-lube the whole tape with a generous amount of White Lithium Grease. It's a bit tricky, but recoil it into the housing and put everything back together. Then reinstall in your car. Hold your breathe and give it shot. Here's a video link to mine working again! Starquest Rear Antenna Video
    4 points
  7. Just a few months ago I created a YouTube video on how to rebuild your rear brakes and the e-brake mechanism. I posted a link to the video on the club, but I forget where I posted it. Either the BS section or the VR. I'll see if I can find the link for you. Also you can still buy brake rebuild kits at Rock Auto. They only cost a few bucks.
    4 points
  8. Johnny Wadd has a post from 2013 in this section on how to do this, but like so many other threads, all the pics are missing, so here's my recreation of this process: You can remove the console latch with the center console still installed in the car. You do NOT have to remove it the whole console unless you want to for some reason. For this tutorial, this console was already removed. First, remove the flocked bin/cubby inside your console by prying up on it. It'll pop out. Next, remove the two hinge bolts that hold the lid. The lid will be removable at this point. Now remove the 4 larger screws you see. Under the map lid you will find 5 smaller screws. Remove all five. Remove the hard plastic piece and you'll have access to the latch. If it's broken, it may just fall out. Don't lose the spring. Wrap the coil spring around your new / or repaired console latch like so. Back in the lid there are two VERY small pin holes. Carefully feed the two posts on the coil spring into the console lid pin holes and snap the latch gently into place. It should look like this. Reverse the process and put the map holder back in with the 5 screws. If the spring is installed properly the latch will be "sprung" into a downward position. When latched, it'll sit in a downward position like so. The act of pulling up on it will unlatch it and allow you open the console lid. The plastic tab on the latch should catch on the plastic ledge cast into the console as shown. That's it. You've replaced, or repaired your center console latch. Reinstall the rest of the screws as necessary put your lid back on the console and enjoy your ride on step closer to perfection!
    3 points
  9. After a lot of thinking, I've decided against selling. My two kids said that I can't sell my "race car"
    3 points
  10. There was one oversight on my part when I got this interior ... I could have just painted it black and called it a day, but, I really would like to switch back to the tan someday, so I didn't really want to do that. Was able to get my hands on a black set. Had to pull the drivers seat and the door sill again to get to the levers. It's held in by two 10mm with the JIS screw heads. I have a JIS screwdriver and the one still stripped trying to get it out, so I replaced them with standard 10mm bolt heads. Was a little bit of work for simple thing, but much better. 😁
    3 points
  11. I've been following about the development of these on IG as he's been posting about them. It's not for me, but I'm just glad someone out there is still developing stuff for this platform. I have more than a few Mookeeh parts on my car.
    3 points
  12. Hi Ya'll, Well I completed a cross country trip from Oakland Oregon to Nashville Tennessee in my car. 2600 miles. I managed to do it in 3 days. I stopped in Idaho and in Nebraska to stay the night. The car performed flawlessly. In fact it did not use any oil the entire trip. I had the oil changed the day before I left and after all those miles...still same amount. The car got pretty warm in Idaho but all the fans worked flawlessly and there was never any problem. I will say that the seat was not so comfortable for all those miles. Well I am living now in Nashville area.. wonder if there are any other members in this area.... ? Send me a message if you live near here maybe we meet up some time... Fionnbharre
    3 points
  13. Funny to be a newbie again with 9k posts...lol As FB and so on is getting more spam than a Hawaiian bbq I think SQC needs to make a comeback. I'm an long time quester if you guys need help with basic questions to get your cars reliable, let me know.
    3 points
  14. Thought I'd post about this. Recently I had a shop try to do an alignment on my quest. Unfortunately, in an effort to fix the toe in the back, the monkeys ended up forcing the bolt over the edges of the rear subframe, bending the hell out of the cam bolt. They bent/ground it so bad I couldn't save it with a hammer. To replace it, I tried calling Mitsu dealers and even hitting up Amayama; no dice. At this point, I decided to get creative to see if I could find something off of another car that could fit. Lo and behold, I did find something. Another vintage Mitsubishi, you may ask? Perhaps some obscure 90's Hyundai whose parts availability is also on borrowed time? Nope, a current generation (specifically 2020) Toyota Rav4 AWD. "Toe adjustment cam sub-assembly" part number 48409-06010: "Camber adjustment cam" part number 48198-07010: Now obviously the little line marks on the cams don't match up to the originals, but anyone performing an alignment in the new millennia is using an alignment rack that spits out fancy numbers in real time, so they aren't needed anyway. For the record, the reason I chose the Rav4 AWD is because one of my coworkers had one I could match up the bolt to. If the bolt is actually different on the non-AWD models, I'm sure it'll fit fine as well.
    3 points
  15. I recently rebuilt my drivers side rear brake, so I decided to film myself doing it. This is meant to work hand-in-hand with the write-ups kev and obsolete did (I reference their write-ups in the video actually). So hopefully between the write-ups and video they should help anyone venturing to do this ... particularly the e-brake process. It's roughly 1/2 hour in total, but you can certain slide to whatever parts you may want to see. Here's the link to my video on YouTube: Starion Conquest Rear Brake Rebuild
    3 points
  16. Finally got a batch of these printed up this week: The glossier 6 on the left are PETG. The more flat black 2 on the right are ABS. I was having some distortion issues with the ABS and had to throw a bunch of them out b/c I wasn't happy with the quality. I have another batch of 6 going in PETG as we speak. If anyone wants one, 15 shipped should do it (10+5 shipping). Shoot me a PM and I'll get one out to you. Things are kinda dead around here these days unfortunately, but if there's enough continual interest I'll put a formal F/S thread in the Bazaar and I can print them as needed.
    2 points
  17. Check it out Starquest on youtube Dad
    2 points
  18. If you click any pics in the gallery they don't open. Just an FYI for whomever might be able to fix it.
    2 points
  19. Just realized I haven't posted a pic on here in 10 years. Battlemagnet is still around, it's got a 1UZFE Lexus V8 swap now, super wide custom Work rims, Lazorack Motorsport widebody, and a bunch of aero I fabricated, along with all of the other carbon fiber stuff it had before.
    2 points
  20. Tony has it, picking it up on Sunday. SOLD!
    2 points
  21. Must be prepared for everything. Thats why I built a waste oil boiler and furnace. Have radiators in the bath room, craft room, and man cave area. Just the heat coming off the boiler keeps it around 56 degrees and that's pretty comfortable if you are working hard, WIFI thermostat so I bump it up before I'm heading out and let the furnace heat it up. I noticed after surgery I'm a bit more cold blooded and its been set to 65. Its been about 16'F lately and I'm nice and cozy in a T-shirt. When things get hot I have a 5 ton AC unit that pulls the whole place down in minutes. You people need to take your hobby a bit more seriously.
    2 points
  22. what we really need is to be able to upload larger resolution images. The max allowed image size is very difficult to work with.
    2 points
  23. Thank you all for your support this year! We wish you a Happy new year ! Free shipping to US 48 states on orders over $100.00 till Sunday Jan 7 2024 ( In stock items only) Dads Engine Parts LLC
    2 points
  24. You can fabricate anything you set your mind to. NDD can even fabricate timelines of delivery!
    2 points
  25. Cal308 passed away in October 2022 in his sleep. He was very knowledgeable about Starquests and will be missed. May he Rest in Peace. His wife, Gwen, wants to sell his car. I posted it up in the Cars For Sale Forum. Jimmy
    2 points
  26. Mookeeh stepped up their packaging game since I last ordered from them.
    2 points
  27. OK, I do have the metal under car shield and that thought did enter my mind. I will need to see if it has the holes that align up. Mitsubishi logic just doesn't jive with mine. I want to do some aero on this car, wish I kept the front clip to make some fiberglass panels. Want to funnel the air from the bumper opening into the rad and do a better job of directing air.
    2 points
  28. I've read some horror stories on here about people rebuilding engines and then having dirty oil coolers that just push junk back into a fresh build. So I wanted to take some time and clean this out. I flushed out the inside with some kerosene and now I'm going to wash the cooling fins with some simple green so it does the best cooling job it can. Cleaned up the banjo bolts and got some new crush washers from Dad. Connected things up at the oil cooler first. Then back up top. Mounted the IC back up while I was at too. And here's a pulled-back shot just to give you a sense of where we're at. Really starting to look like a car again.
    2 points
  29. I've noticed the "OH NO" screen is still up from back when the site came back up years ago. May I suggest a new Home screen for Starquest Club? Maybe photos of members cars?
    2 points
  30. I stock the pads, https://www.dadsengineparts.com Dad
    2 points
  31. JERSEY ARTFORM’s Slammed 1983’ Mitsubishi Starion build. I got the bare shell given to me for free a couple months ago & have just started building it back. I just made some coilovers for it & slammed it to the ground. Next comes an engine swap.here’s a YouTube video of the coilover build
    2 points
  32. Mods: I tried to post this in the Fuel/ECU sub-forum but I don't have 10 posts yet; feel free to move this over Hi everyone, been a long time lurker, first time poster. I picked up a 87 Conquest two weeks ago and have been having fun going through it. It sat for 15ish years, mostly inside however when I pulled the gas tank, it needed cleaning; when I removed the sending unit, the sensor (is it a sensor? It looks like it's a housing for a resistor) was disintegrated. These sending units are no longer available, neither OEM nor aftermarket. I called around a couple places and was getting an estimated 6 months and $350-$600 to rebuild it; Tristar Radiator which was recommended here and elsewhere was so backed up they wouldn't even give a price because they aren't taking new work. In posting on the facebook group, someone mentioned other folks had success with a Montero sending unit, specifically part number MB571603. This part IS available from Mitsubishi for ~$100 based on where you order it from, it is also available aftermarket, for ~$20. I believed my issue was the disintegrated sensor, so I took a $20 gamble on amazon and bought this one aftermarket one hopeing I could just take the sensor off of it and put in on my old sender: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B09VB8CG84 . The short story is that it worked. Looking at the pictures for this sending unit, it appears that while that hat is different, and the connector is different, the rest of it is very very very mechanically close to ours with the stuff that goes in the tank. In theory if you felt like doing some fabrication to your existing sender hat, you may be able to figure out how to disconnect (or cut out) your existing mechanism and attach the one from the new sender. I didn't feel like going this route because my suspicion is that the only thing wrong with mine was the sender and I'm comfortable soldering a single wire. I'd imagine that say if your float was bad on your original sender, you'd likely have success replacing yours with the one from this Montero sender. As stated above, soldering in the new sensor worked. The only weird thing is that while the guage moves as you would expect by manually moving the float arm, my low fuel warning lite seems to stay on all the time when the ignition is on ON; this may be a function that the car isn't actually running, and/or that it has no fuel tank and the fuel pump isn't connected; I'm not sure, as this is the first experience I have with one of these cars. Even if it's abnormal, I'll take a working needle with an always on low fuel light over nothing! Pic 1 and 2: Side by Side, you can see the Montero (bottom) sender looks pretty darn similar with regards to everything that lives in the tank. Pic 3: You can see the hats are different; the Montero sender has 3 holes and is more triangular in shape. The holes in the Montero hat in no way match up to to our hat. Pic 4: Connectors are different however both are three terminal setup Pic 5: My dirty sender; all I needed to do is take a soldering iron, melt the old solder, remove the old wire Pic 6: Here's the connection point on my original sender, after I removed the old sensor wire I took a file and filed mine down some to get rid of rust/dirt Pic 7: On the Montero sender, I just cut the wire and stripped a little of the insulation off, and then soldered it onto my old sender. I had soaked my sender (not fully submerged, just up to the bottom of the hat) and soaked/submerged pickup in vinegar for 24hrs in between Pic 6 and 7, it worked great! Pic 8: Attach the sender sensor on the bottom of the rod Pic 9: Here's the cleaned up original sender with the new Montero sensor Pic 10: Here's my working gas gauge when manipulating the float arm!
    2 points
  33. 2 points
  34. Now for the fun part ... the part I've been waiting for! My son helped me ... started out by steam cleaning everything. This is the water after just the back seat. It was a beautiful day, so we put everything out in the sun to dry. While he continued to work on that I worked on getting the lap belts back in place. The ACC carpet comes pre-molded as if you were putting the carpet OVER the belts, when really the lap belts are carpeted already and the main carpet needs to go UNDER. So, you'll have to do some fancy (and careful) cutting to make it work. Both sides done. After that I started by getting the rear bolsters in place. Then the rear uppers. Then the rear lower. I forgot to cut the holes for this, so I had to cut them out quick. Next I started getting the plastics in place. Door sills and kick panels. Next I went to the door cards. Last but not least ... the best part ... the seats! All told, it took me 2 solid days of working. Most of the time was spent on the carpet. Huge improvement. My leather was so hard and dry, it feels completely different to drive the car in this soft plushy interior. Now I just have to get used to it being black instead of tan! For now, I'm going to store my tan interior b/c I would like to reupholster it someday, but this will work for now.
    2 points
  35. Here is another write-up by obsolete. I just moved this to the FAQ section.
    2 points
  36. Made it out to another car show the other week sponsored by a local shop to me - NLS, Nothing Leaves Stock. They mostly specilaize in VW based stuff, but they've done stuff for me over the years too so I try to support them at their show when I can. Walked away with a top 25 trophy this time. Fun little Tiki style trophy. 😁
    2 points
  37. Welcome back! I agree with you on the FB vs SQC topic. I lurk on FB but hardly post anything. I find it amazing how many basic questions are asked, which are answered in detail on this site, but people don't even bother to look. Then when I go to reply with a link to a thread on here, the response gets auto-blocked because it contains a link.
    2 points
  38. Was at a local Father's Day car show with 4 close friends. Starion, Supra, MR2, and the Cougar ... Couple of pics from they day:
    2 points
  39. Well I wish my build thread still existed b/c I'd point you there. But I pretty did what you said. Pulled the engine, stripped the bay of everything. Had the car shot and then as I was putting it back together I rebuilt everything that could be rebuilt. Painted or powdercoated along the way and maybe the best kept secret .... replaced all the hardware. Some people clean and re-zinc theirs ... I was lazy. Just bought all new. Mostly 10, 12 and 14mm.
    2 points
  40. I don't want to say I'm ready to start selling these, but I'm really close... Recently I was over a BKB94's house and we were talking about top windshield trim project I posted about. That got us talking about the left and right side windshield trim pieces. I was telling him I was 99% sure the side clips weren't available anymore. He happened to have a spare he sent me home with one. So, I've spent the last week or so modeling this thing when I've had a few spare moments at work. All I need to do test out the fitment on an actual car, but I think these are gonna work. Factory Clip on Left. Anyone know off-hand how many total are on a side?
    2 points
  41. Now I am officially in the club! 1987 with some 1988 and 1989 parts. Like the Johnny Cash song, "One Piece at a Time!"
    2 points
  42. Sounds good. I'll get you those photos of the A-pillar. They are on a drive in my office which is in the basement. It's just that I physically can't go down there at the moment, for I broke my leg. I have to collect all of these photos and see if I can develop a good thread on what is needed for auto to manual belt conversion. I know that I don't have photos of the removal of the three studs on each side of the roof nor the removal of that plate at the rear upper doorway, but I might have enough to describe the process. Plus, it's been around six years since I did this, my memory fades on some of the details (gotta love aging).
    2 points
  43. To do a 'proper' auto to manual seat belt conversion, you need a ton of parts: * Both manual seat belt mechanisms which include the belt mechanism, the trim clip that goes into the door card, mounting bolts (one on each end), and the upper latch. * The rear corner upper door panel trim (the small piece that runs up the side of the window in the back) mounting clip with screws (zinc plated bracket shown in the photos above) * The rear corner upper door panel trim (the small piece that runs up the side of the window in the back) - This is all you really need for the door panels themselves because the original auto seat belt door panels can easily be modified as shown in my photos above. Although, I just remembered something; the 87 on up cars large upper door panel has a hole in it to accept the rear corner upper trim. This will be visible with the manual upper door panel trim. I did some vinyl repair on mine to 'close the hole'. If you happen to have access to the main upper door panel on a manual car, it is beneficial to utilize them. They will also have the belt guides on them, which is the next item below. * The door panel seat belt guides with two screws each - not really a necessity, as seen in the photos above * The plastic A-pillar covers WITH clips/hardware * The manual belt main headliner (sunroof vs non-sunroof, as required for your car) INCLUDING the two side rails WITH side rail clips/hardware - Note the rear vinyl covered headliner is not needed - it is the same between manual or auto belts * Upper AND lower B-pillar covers (i.e. sides of the rear seat) - they mount the same as the auto belt covers. * The clear plastic inserts for the door panels to keep water from getting on the seat belt mechanisms. * IMPORTANT: The seat belt latch on the driver and passenger seats depending on what year car you have vs the year of the donor belts car! In my case, I used seatbelts out of an 86 with 88/89 seats - no issue. But if you have 87 seats, the latch will be the wrong size. There are also some differences on earlier model car seatbelts. Before you do anything, make sure your manual seat belts 'click' into the latches on your seat! Also note that on 87 seats, the seat belt latch is approximately six inches forward from where it really should be (I honestly don't know if it can be moved back or not, I haven't done a manual belt conversion using 87 seats). You make the determination if that is acceptable to you or not...just make sure the belt latches before you go any further! * 85/86 style center console tray * 83-86 style power mirror switch with trim plate for the center console * 83-86 style rear center console without the seat belt holes This isn't the easiest of conversions, to be honest. You need a lot of parts to do it correctly and modifications to the car body are needed. Some people just leave all the interior trim go and not install the rear upper portion of the door panels. This will allow use of the manual belts but the missing trim will be noticeable along with the auto belt track.
    2 points
  44. This piece here will interfere with the upper door panel trim on a manual seat belt car. If you want to use the trim, it will have to be removed. Here it is with the manual headliner and manual b-pillar panels: The upper door panel trim near the manual belt upper latch will not let the door close until you remove the curved sheet metal above. Note that this car didn't use the seatbelt clip on the upper door panel...it will work fine without it. Here are some views of the mounts. You will need the upper door panel mounting clip. It is one large clip in lieu of two on an auto seat belt car The lower belt mount. The tapped hole is there already on an auto seat belt car. Just need the bolt (in fact, the bolt might be there as well...I forgot if it was or not) The clear plastic to go behind the belt in the door is a nice to have...will prevent water from going on the seat belt mechanism.
    2 points
  45. hey guys.. its been a while for me.. had a TSI back in 98-2002.. ended up selling the car and regret it big time..recently bought a decent 89 TSI and will be getting it back to road worthiness... car wasn't running... figured out this weekend that the fuel pump was not working.. I plan on upgrading to the Bosch 044... MY QUESTION is this.. since I have the tank down I thought it'd be a good idea to tackle the differential cover leak..and change the gear oil too... not sure if I can get a gasket for that cover? should I make my own? or just use silicone?.. any advice is greatly appreciated!!..
    1 point
  46. Another Cars and Coffee this morning. There were 3 of us there today.
    1 point
  47. First official outing in the Conquest. Took it to a local Cars And Coffee 35min away.
    1 point
  48. (scroll down for video) Well my build thread doesn’t exist anymore… I’ll just do a timeline If anyone remembers… May2009–bought car not running Nov2015–finally running rebuilt w/ 16G May2017–dyno’d 265whp w/ 16G MS2 ECU June2017–blew HG at drag strip July2017-July2020-rebuilt engine, went MPI, struggled with tuning..quit July2020–decided 1JZ/R154 swap Mar2022–took roller to TRA in Ohio Jan2023–car is complete and ready for pickup. Team Rocket Auto in Hamilton did the full engine swap for me. I took them the roller and all parts. Results: 617whp @ 26psi 750whp @ 35psi
    1 point
  49. There’s no limit to what I’ll pay for convenience and promptness 😁
    1 point
  50. Information provided by: techboy Your car is about 30 years old now and most likely has had a handful of owners. If you're anything like me, you have very little history to go on, esp. as it relates to basic maintenance. So, if you haven't, maybe it's time to change the fluid in your rear diff. If you changed your own oil before, it's not too much harder than that, just a little bit more difficult b/c you don't have an easy access fill in your trunk like you would your engine oil in the engine bay. Let's get started: First, if you don't have access to a lift you need to jack up the rear of your car nice and high. It's going to probably end up being a bit of a messy (and smelly) job, so you might want to throw down some cardboard if you have any, esp. if you care at all about your garage floor. My metrics only go up to a 22mm and that wasn't big enough, so I had find a standard that fit the drain and fill plug. A 15/16 seemed to be the perfect fit. Now let's find the drain and fill. The drain is smack right on the bottom of the diff here: The fill is up a bit further on the drivers side of the car here: file:///C:/Users/Jimmy/Desktop/Way%20Back%20Machine/v2/800x600q90/922/GqKi8R.jpg Because I was curious about whether or not my diff was even filled to proper level, I decided to crack the fill plug first. To my surprise, it actually was as I got a little bit of seepage once I cracked the bolt. Now that I knew that, it was time to throw a pan under and drain the old fluid. While the fluid was draining I thought it was a good time to clean up the two plugs a bit. The one with the magnet on the left is your drain plug and will probably have some heavy gunk on the magnet, you can go ahead and clean that up. The one on the right is the fill plug. I ran both of the them on the wire wheel to clean them up. Be careful of the copper crush washers found on both of the plugs. I cleaned both the washers up real good with some brake clean. If you have a store of copper washers laying around and have some that fit, using new ones probably isn't a bad idea. I didn't realize they were copper until I had the plugs out and didn't have the time luxury to buy new ones, so I reused the originals. Don't try that will coolant lines or fuel though, usually doesn't work. Once all the fluid has drained out you can put your drain plug back in with your 15/16th and get ready to go back the other way. First thing I did was find one of the smaller funnels I had and rigged up about a 6 inch feed tube with some extra hose I had laying around in the garage. I also cut myself a small piece of a wire tie .. more on that in a minute. There's not a ton of room under the car to refill your diff easily, but it can be done. I wedged my funnel up under the car like so, and used the wire tie to hold the funnel to the brake line right near the rear splitter. Here's another look at it from a slightly different angle, looking a bit more toward the drivers side rear tire. You can see there's a pretty good amount of room in the area in the red to get your hand up in there an pour. If I were to do it again, I might try taking the drivers side rear tire off and use a longer hose on my funnel ... might be easier ... not sure. At this point I stole a small plastic container from the kitchen, about the size of a baby food jar to use to pour the fluid into the funnel since I determined there was no way I was gonna get a whole diff fluid bottle in there. I'm not gonna discuss in this thread what oil to use, what's good, and what's not. If you're looking at this I'm assuming you've already done that homework and probably have already purchased whatever it is you're using. If not, there's lots of good threads you can read up using the search button. The FSM calls for a 80W-90, I can tell you that much. Depending on what threads you read and what oil you choose to go with, you might need/want to purchase an LSD additive as well. Almost done. It took me a little bit, but I just kept filling the little cup and pouring it in slowly. You need about 1.3 quarts so you won't quite use 1/2 the 2nd bottle. Just keep filling till it starts coming out the fill hole. Put your fill plug back in and tighten it down snug. You can also sneak one last look at your drain plug too while you're under there. Make sure you don't see any weeping now that you've got fluid back in the diff, esp if you reused the copper crush washer. One last thing, I took a can of brake cleaner and sprayed the whole diff down and cleaned it up real good so I could keep an eye out for any future weeping or leaks. If all goes well, it should look something like this when your done. Clean up, put your car back down on the ground and go for a test drive.
    1 point
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