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  1. But it is worth every penny! Then you know for sure what is going on with your air fuel mixture.
    2 points
  2. So ever since the ISC swap it never has done the cut out problem. I have about 1100 miles on it now since I got it running at the first of the year. If I didn't have a company truck it would be my daily driver.
    1 point
  3. Figure I'd post an update on this. I'm still working on the car. Had to travel for business for a few weeks and spent this past Saturday at Carlisle Import Nationals with the blue car, but I'm still picking away at the black one. Those of you who know me, know that I love making tools! I use to do it for a living, well still kind of do but more on a managerial front now. Love making simple contraptions with stuff I have laying around the garage. Anywyas, I made this wrist pin press out of some old scrap bar stock and a 4T bottle jack. It worked slick! Next, I made a homemade connecting rod balancer jig. Nothing but some wood, a few L brackets, spare hardware, and a skateboard wheel. Bought the scale from amazon for $13. Surprisingly, it was very repeatable! The skateboard wheel was the trick. I tried a few things prior that didn't work too well. It's just a bushing on the other side. Would have been better if it was a ball bearing but I didn't have any small enough. I went down this rabbit hole because I was experiencing vibration on this car with the BSE. Found out the stock rods differed by up to 5 grams! And that wasn't just this particular engine, for I weighed the ones out of the donor engine is well. The pistons also differed by up to 4 grams! In the end, I balanced both the rods and pistons to within .1-.2g. Last, I made up a jig to hold the piston to install the wrist pins. Just factory style piston (.020 over) and pressed pin. Heated up the rod with a MAP torch and slid the pin in. The red bolt was used as a stop so I could slide the pin in quickly before the rod cooled down without having to try to visually center it. I didn't have any flat plate, so I used an old flywheel from a Jeep. It also worked slick. Painted and cleaned block. I didn't snap anymore photos yet but the engine is currently pretty much assembled. Bottom end is together. All the measurements were spot on, plastigage good, etc. Head/manifolds are on and torqued. Did a leak-down test to verify no leaks into the coolant or pass the valves. Then installed the cam and rockers but called it quits last night because it was late. Just need to install the timing stuff and cover/oil pan/etc. It should be ready to go back in the car in under 2 more hours of work. In parallel, got in the pedals for the 5 speed swap, master cylinder, and clutch line. Still need to do the access port for the 5 speed shifter. I'll do the trans mount last with the engine and trans in the car.
    1 point
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