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Fusible Links


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#1 JAinsworth

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Posted 24 March 2009 - 05:49 PM

Thanks to cyberquest and www.starquest.i-x.net


Posted Image

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those pics were taken from this topic, any info on fuseable links can be found here.
<a href="http://starquest.i-x...pic.php?t=1180" target="_blank">http://starquest.i-x...<!--QuoteEEnd-->

You'll need: (2) Red, (1)Green, (1) Brown, and (1) Black to replace all the lines shown.

The black one goes from the positive post on the battery to a small plastic box. Open that box and remove the nut to replace the link. It goes to the alternator.





#2 JAinsworth

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Posted 08 April 2010 - 06:37 PM

View PostIndiana, on 08 April 2010 - 06:09 PM, said:

They are in every auto parts store it doesn't matter if they are pretty and have the ends on them already you can even buy the wire in a spool and make your own. They are only color coded from Mitsubishi and not all color coding is the same. Its the diameter of the strands INSIDE that insulation that determines their load capacity. You can find the WIRE SIZE of the link and go anywhere and get these things.

and here it is, its also in the factory service manual

http://www.b2600turb...k_fuselinks.htm

The links are Green, Red and Brown. A fusible link is always 2 wire sizes smaller the the wire it protects. Stranded wire is used in automobiles to remain flexible and not break. Wire is sized by gauge and it is the actual wire measured not including the insulation.

Below is a small chart to show:
A) common wire sizes,
B) their name as a given gauge (AWG=American Wire Gauge) and permissible current when used in
C) the engine compartment and
D) other areas. Common wire sizes are given as millimeters squared.

   A B C D 0.3 AWG22 - 5A

0.5 AWG20 7A 13A

0.85 AWG18 9A 17A

1.25 AWG16 12A 22A

2.0 AWG14 16A 30A

3.0 AWG12 21A 40A

5.0 AWG10 31A 54A

Mitsubishi fusible links by color and size. Size shown is millimeters squared.

  Color Wire Size Brown 0.3

Green 0.5

Red 0.85

Black 1.25

Looking at the two charts above and remembering that fusible links are to be two wire sizes smaller than the wire they protect would would mean the follow:

A Brown fusible link is used to protect an 18ga wire.

A Green fusible link is used to protect a 16ga wire.

A Red fusible link is used to protect a 14ga wire.

A Black fusible link is used to protect a 12ga wire.

You shouldn't "rate" a link in amps because they aren't fuses rather they deteriorate over time but do have a limit so don't assume for example that a Red fusible link is the same as a 30amp fuse. If you have a device that needs a fuse then use one but by using fusible links and fuses you can be protected against failure in some cases from cuts or corrosion that would otherwise be more serious if the fusible links had not been used.


#3 JAinsworth

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Posted 08 April 2010 - 10:13 PM

View PostDad, on 08 April 2010 - 08:22 PM, said:

Look like you should NOT use regular wire..... the Insulation is  special...

http://whiteproducts...ible-faqs.shtml

Dad


#4 JAinsworth

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Posted 09 April 2010 - 07:55 AM

View PostIndiana, on 09 April 2010 - 02:07 AM, said:

Its not the insulation its the strands the fuse link is made up of. If you buy a link in a bubble pack it usually has one end on it already. Home improvement stores have electrical connectors. Electrical supply stores have these parts. Fusible link WIRE is what you are looking for. The terminals put on the ends are for ease of installation and in this car that's how they did it, in other cars it might be in the harness and not removable. Automakers have been using this wire in their harnesses for a very long time. The battery acid screws ours up they are in a poor location.
Just search "fusible link wire" and if you use google, click the "images" link at the top just to see pictures to click on. Its used everywhere in many things.

Napa has spools of it and they sell terminal ends too.





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