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What tools should a person start with?


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#1 indy_85stariones

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Posted 27 June 2004 - 01:12 AM

Reading thru some posts here, I have discovered quite a few new owners who are still in their teens.   They don't have an older brother (or whomever) to watch and learn how to work on cars.   Good question.  What tools should a person start with?

My opinion.  

PB Blaster -- for soaking rusty frozen bolts and screws.
WD-40 (or Liquid Wrench, or 3-in-1 oil) -- good penetrating oil.
Silicon Spray -- for anything rubber, like sunroof and door weather proof seals.

Sears/Craftsman magnetic hex-head screwdriver with inter-changeable tips.  The tips can be phillips, blade, allen head, torqex, etc -- in various sizes.  If available, purchase a Reed & Prince 3/16" tip -- for work on throttle body.  Best part.  The screw (unless alluminum) stays on the tip of the screwdriver and doesn't end up lost somewhere.  

Six point (Not 12 point) 3/8" drive metric socket set.  Snap-on 3/8" drive rachet with S-shaped handle.   Short, Medium, and long extensions.  

The socket for our spark plugs.  I forget the size right now.  It isn't a regular deep-weel socket.  It is a spark plug socket with the foam inside for protect ceramic of spark plug.
1 piece of scrap rubber fuel hose to place firmly around spark plug to help find threads when installing.  

12 point box-end metric wrench set.

No need for Open-end metric wrench set.  

No need for Combination (One side box-end, the other side open-end) metric wrench set.  

I forget the correct term, they look like 6 point box end -- only there is a small opening.  These wrenches are used around fuel lines, oil lines to turbo, and coolant lines.   Purchase these individually as needed.

1 Vise-grip brand vise-grips.  

1 pry-bar -- never use a screwdriver for prying.  

1 exacto razor blade knife.

1 packet of 220 grit wet-dry(black) sandpaper.

1 tire pressure gauge -- 0 to 90 psi to use with both cars and 10-speed bicycles.

1 portable air compressor that plugs into cigarette lighter.

1 inductive timing light.

Anyone else's thoughts????

 








#2 JustPaus_88TSi

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Posted 27 June 2004 - 01:33 AM

Umm...

Electrical tape..

Digital and Analog Volt Meters..

Regular old curcuit tester(the kind that looks like a screwdriver, but with a light inside the clear case, and a aligator clip)..

Couple boxes of multi-amp fuses..

A few rolls of 16-18gauge wire, or a bunch of fusible links..

I think you summed it up nicely Indy, especially the part about the Prince&Reed bits... I didn't know about those until 6 months ago--let alone they're for our TB..
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#3 JAinsworth

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Posted 27 June 2004 - 03:35 AM

The wrench used for the turbo oil line is called a flare nut wrench.  (12mm)

You do need a set of open end wrenches.  Can't unbolt the driveshaft with a closed end.

An impact driver and hammer are useful also.

Jimmy

#4 voltron

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Posted 27 June 2004 - 06:57 AM

1 good floor jack ;D
pair of jack stands ;D
1 creeper ;D
and a digital camera to upload pixs on this site to show progress, or to show problems you will run into. wink.gif


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#5 TainterRacing

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Posted 27 June 2004 - 07:25 AM

QUOTE
The wrench used for the turbo oil line is called a flare nut wrench.  (12mm)

You do need a set of open end wrenches.  Can't unbolt the driveshaft with a closed end.

An impact driver and hammer are useful also.

Jimmy


mm I all ways use a Boxed end wrench on all I have done..... work fine for me and I want to add amen to that Impact driver smile.gif
Some other things that might be noted geting the cheapest tools made is not a good Idea they Brake/ strip MUCH MUCH ezer then a good tool will I like ACE hardware Pro tools and Husky makes good ones as well and S&K and I am not much of a cramsman fan but it is mostly do to they are alot farther from me and oo kobalt is good as well. !!!! TOOL SHOP VERY BAD most un names tools BAD I would allways look for ones that have a lifetime garenty of some kind if they dont stand by there tools most likly it is junk ooo and one More habour frieght tools are not that bad i say that not that they are good but they have a  middli of the line tools to down right good stuff and some gunk as well they say they have a lifetime garenty  as well on there stuff.


And other good tip I wouls get in the habbit of allways useing PB or something like it working on a older car it is bound to have alot of stuck bolts and so on and  just put it on just incase it can realy save time you know what I mean if you have broke some bolt heads off in parts you need.

#6 ZPI28

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Posted 27 June 2004 - 08:00 AM

QUOTE
The socket for our spark plugs.  I forget the size right now.  It isn't a regular deep-weel socket.  It is a spark plug socket with the foam inside for protect ceramic of spark plug.
1 piece of scrap rubber fuel hose to place firmly around spark plug to help find threads when installing.  


No need for Combination (One side box-end, the other side open-end) metric wrench set.  

That would be a 13/16 sparkplug socket, And the Combination wrenches are a must if your going to be working on the driveshaft and in the engine bay.

I used to boxed end wrenches when changing my driveshaft yesterday and I had the rear tires on ramps, so I never turned the driveshaft. I was able to get to all the bolts with them lined straight up and down.  ;D
would also like to add a good testlight.. comes in handy..
And Line wrenches used for those nasty brake lines..

Steven
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#7 mikec

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Posted 27 June 2004 - 11:20 AM

For the true car rookies out there... a couple fairly cheap things:
1.  A copy of the factory manuals for your car, or at least the scanned versions (PDF files) that can be downloaded.  READ THEM A COUPLE TIMES - NOT JUST BEFORE YOU DECIDE TO WORK ON SOMETHING.  Leave a copy by the toilet and read a few pages each time... get to know your car.  Some of the tips in one chapter will apply to jobs in some totally different chapter - the manuals are not organized like a cookbook with all steps spelled out each time.

2.  TIME.  Many people, once they get their "new" car, are just too impatient to do the job right.  Either that, or they don't really have the funds RIGHT NOW to do the whole job so they want to Mickey-Mouse it.  Not a good idea.  

3.  A good ear.  Turn down that blasting stereo once in a while and listen to the car.  Any new noises?  New noises mean something has changed... and cars generally don't "change for the better."  Noises, new and old, are warning signs of problems.  Problems that most likely will escalate into major (expensive) problems if ignored.  At least identify the source of the noise to find out if the problem won't get worse; i.e. squeeking when turning the steering wheel could mean the strut isolators are worn... you can drive that way for a little while though.  Engine rattles/clunks?  PARK IT!  Also, "I don't have time to fix it right now" or "I don't have the money right now" don't mean anything to your car.  When it gives you a warning by making new noises, vibrations, etc...  it wants help NOW.  Unless you know it's a "won't get worse" problem like the strut isolators, if you can't fix it now, you're probably better off parking the car before the problem gets much worse.  Ask anybody that's noticed a "clunking" from the engine... only to have a rod blow a hole through the block a few miles later.  A good friend of mine ignored this advice... as he was leaving my place, I heard a rattle sound from his engine - like marbles rolling around an empty coffee can.  That's 99.9% of the time a worn water pump.  I told him, he said "it just started doing that last week."  A WEEK?  He popped the hood and I confirmed it was the water pump.  "I don't have time right now."  And he left.  And drove the car to/from work the following week.  Well, blasting down the freeway (at around 80 mph since he was late from the client's building to his home office for his annual review) the water pump finally let go.  It siezed.  On this particular car (Honda CRX) the water pump is driven by a V-belt from the camshaft... thus the camshaft siezed.  10 of the 12 valves in that engine got bent when pistons smashed into them at 4000RPM (80+mph remember?).  And the timing belt stripped totally.  It cost $1400 to put that engine back together.  For a $30 water pump + Owner Impatience.  This same guy also got himself stranded on the side of the road driving his dad's pickup truck... I noticed the V-belts on it were really old and cracked and warned him "these things are going to bust any time now."  He didn't even make it home.  NOW he listens to my advice.

4.  When posting on the boards looking for help, provide as much info as you can: model year, tranny type, any modifications, etc.  Describe the noises/vibrations/symptoms as specifically as you can and WHEN they happen: hot engine, cold engine, accelerating, coasting, while turning, when the moon is green, whatever.

mike c.

#8 Shelby

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Posted 27 June 2004 - 12:17 PM

very  good post Indy,, i just  wish Mike would have  left it in the BS section for a bit longer,, lots of people  have never  been to the FAQ  forum hehe
couple small things,,
to go along with the  standard  floor  jack( and the  jap versions  can be  bought  for  arroud $160 now  and will do  you a very good  job)
you'l need to  watch the sales and pickup one of them  cheap low profile   floor  jacks,,$19.95 or so why  to  raise the car  to assist geting the biger  floor  jack in  place very handy for a lower then normal rideing  car
a couple  small inj tester lamps,  or noid  lites
diff length of test leads with alligator clips,,one  atleast  20 ft long  
a few  low  voltage  leds
nail file, with the  point'd end  broken off (for inj terminals and coolant temp terminals )
a couple of   old bath towels,,for use as fender covers,,
some thing  i have never heard mention'd on this site  in over 4 yr's  lol

and if you have a  question,, read other posts  that may  seem close to you problem , you'l  find a wider   range of posibilites  that way, and  besides you may be  calling  it  wrong

keep an open mind ,it's all  to likely you may have   3 to  6 or more problems all at the same time  , no law  says  only one thing  can be wrong at one time
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#9 indy_85stariones

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Posted 27 June 2004 - 01:08 PM

QUOTE
The wrench used for the turbo oil line is called a flare nut wrench.  (12mm)


Flare Nut -- Yeah, that's the term that I was looking for.  

I must admit that I own a set of combination wrenches.   Since they are shorter than box-end, I use them to get into hard-to-reach cramped areas.  

I don't like to round the head off of the bolts/nuts in my car.   When an open-end wrench slips -- and it will for people just learning how to use tools -- the corners of the bolt/nuts will round off.  

If a bolt/nut turns easily, then open-end is just fine.  However, for those bolts/nuts that require a little force.  This is the order to choose which tool to use.

1)  Use 6 point socket with high-quality rachet.  
2)  Use 12 point box-end (of either combination set or box-end set)
3)  Purchase a flare-nut wrench before using an open-end  




#10 Shelby

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Posted 27 June 2004 - 02:44 PM

Hey  Indy  congrads on the  FAQ wink.gif
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#11 Professor Quest

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Posted 27 June 2004 - 09:15 PM

A 19mm THIN open end wrench sure comes in handy when you want to change the fuel filter. And you can't use Flare nut or line wrenches on some of the fuel lines. I might have missed it...............but a propane torch sure comes in handy and a set of METRIC tap and dies sure are nice. Sears sells tool sets in a carry-box that are pretty nice to start with. wink.gif A 23mm 6 point socket is a must for the crank bolt

#12 Dcrasta

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Posted 27 June 2004 - 09:46 PM

Anyone post ..

3/8 torque wrench
1/2 torque wrench
12 point deep sockets (good for Arp fastners)
1/4 drive sockets and rachet (down to 5mm-12)
5-6-8 allen sockets
telescopic magnetic rod (good for grabbing dropped things)
1/2 breaker bar.
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#13 Banky

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Posted 04 July 2004 - 10:52 PM

I didnt read every post, so I apologize if this was already said but A necessary tool is the rear brake tool to turn the piston in. Its about $10 at autozone.

#14 smog

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Posted 09 July 2004 - 01:21 PM

I'm suprised no one mentioned c clamps because you know everyone is going to be replacing those damn ujoints eventually  8). A 4 inch c clamp is a must, and they are cheap. You can also use them for working on the brakes.

I'd suggest ratchet wrenches also. Those are the handiest SOBs I have ever used.

I suggest a full set of metric sockets in 1/2, 3/8and 1/4 with multiple length extensions.
- The long sockets for 3/8 and 1/4 are bvery useful too. You can usually get a good dea on the sears big arse socket sets if you watch for sales. The craftsman stuff is pretty good.

Buy yourself a high quality set of medium sized snap ring plyers
-.Proto makes a nice set that I used for my gigantic turbo snap ring along with the u joints. Don't buy a cheap pair of snap ring plyers, you will be lucky to use them once before the cheap things bend or break. I learned my lesson the hard way there.

Get yourself a leatherman. No man should be without one of those wink.gif

! big extension cord, and a good work light for working at night.
-Those compact fluorescents work great in the work lights, just try nott o break one, it wouldnt be pretty.

A decent pair of channel locks are always handy for emergencies

If you are doing any serious electrical work get yourself a good pair of crimping plyers.

Buy a few pairs of gloves too. I;ve saved many a skinned knuckles with them on.  when I was breaking a bolt.


Having the right tool can make all the difference.
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#15 indy_85stariones

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Posted 09 July 2004 - 11:16 PM

For Throttle Body Rebuild...

The throttle body bolts can be difficult to remove. They look like regular phillips head, but they really need a Reed & Prince head screwdriver.

http://www.weisd.com/store2/XCERP102.html
Xcelite RP102 Frearson (Reed & Prince) 3/16"




#16 redskinjay

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Posted 15 February 2005 - 09:22 AM

Well,,one thing i'd like to add,,,its not a necessity but man it sure makes the jobs alot easier is a set of gear wrenches from sears,,,the racheting box end,,,makes the job alot easier in tight places.

Jay

#17 haztoys

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Posted 15 February 2005 - 10:30 AM

It's "not" your tools.... Its "what" you do with your tool's . Is what counts wink.gif

A good tool is you brain... This fourm is a good tool .. You young guys do not understand . That just getting the "info" on how to fix a car . Is so EZ now .

A nother good tool . Is some Old Fart that has all the tools , You can use.

Have a Good Day

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#18 4NMOPAR

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Posted 08 June 2005 - 10:45 AM

Anyone have a pic of this Reed and Prince head screwdriver ?  This is new to me but I don't know jack so please DO post along with whatever else is weird for these cars, what's a good torque wrench to acquire ?

#19 GAZZA

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Posted 08 June 2005 - 02:14 PM

Here's shot of the Reed and Prince screwdriver tip
http://buy1.snapon.com/catalog/item.asp?P6...amp;dir=catalog

#20 4NMOPAR

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Posted 09 June 2005 - 02:54 PM

ok cool, this is for the TB again right ?, sorta looks like a deep phillips !  Anyways while I got you guys giving suggestions out what a good torque wrench to get, Craftsman ones any good ?




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