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What do you guys think DIY kit?

Exhaust Manifold

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#1 fang988

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Posted 17 February 2017 - 01:46 PM

What do you guys think of this DIY kit from  Treadstone?
http://www.treadston...d Collector Kit

I am only literally minutes away from  their shop so it is easier to get these parts for me. I will eventually and most likely be running one of their manifolds some time in the future. Do you think the Log mani they sell would be better?
http://www.treadston... Turbo Manifoldd





#2 NotStock88

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Posted 17 February 2017 - 02:30 PM

If you have fabrication experience and a welder Im sure you could make one up but buying the cast manifold would be alot easier ;)
NOOB

#3 fang988

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Posted 17 February 2017 - 04:28 PM

What about performance wise?

#4 Turbo Cary

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Posted 17 February 2017 - 06:25 PM

I would think the DIY kit welded properly would be better performance wise. Having equal length runners is good. The log style I would think be thicker and less likely to crack.

#5 Chad

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Posted 17 February 2017 - 08:34 PM

I'll not go into detail because I sell a competing product, and it will appear self-serving.  

I can tell you that you (I) can piece it together for less than that package price.

Completing one start to finish is 5-7 hours all considered.  10+ if you don't already have a set design

It's a great learning experience if you already have some welding and fab skill.  It requires special gas and welder fillers if you are using MIG.  It can be a terrible and expensive experience if you are new to this sort of thing or don't have  a good compliment of supporting fab tools.  I have a lot of hard learned and expensive lessons in mine.  I wouldn't trade those lessons for anything, so I respect the do-it-yourself attitude.

#6 Bradrock

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Posted 17 February 2017 - 08:48 PM

"Completing one start to finish is 5-7 hours"      I can spend that long scratching my head over one piece of the pie on a regular exhaust header. :)  And I have no experience with back purging yet. Look forward to learning on my new welder  though. I've noticed that like everything else there are youtubes on it.

I'm saving up for Chad's products because it's obvious he's top notch & priced very reasonable. Too bad my S.S. check is not so reasonable! :lol: :D :lol:
Run's with scizzor's

#7 fang988

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Posted 17 February 2017 - 08:51 PM

I I went that route, I was thinking I would just have a exsperienced welder do it.

#8 fang988

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Posted 17 February 2017 - 08:54 PM

View PostBradrock, on 17 February 2017 - 08:48 PM, said:

"Completing one start to finish is 5-7 hours"      I can spend that long scratching my head over one piece of the pie on a regular exhaust header. :)  And I have no experience with back purging yet. Look forward to learning on my new welder  though. I've noticed that like everything else there are youtubes on it.

I'm saving up for Chad's products because it's obvious he's top notch & priced very reasonable. Too bad my S.S. check is not so reasonable! :lol: :D :lol:

I remember seeing one of your manifolds pop up here not too long ago.  I didn't think you were still making the exhaust ones. How much do they cost?

#9 Chad

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Posted 18 February 2017 - 12:51 AM

I'm still making them, as of a few months ago.  I moved and was able to re-setup my workshop.  I have one for sale for $550, and am currently developing a revision that I hope to offer for a little less.  It will have a little less labor in the design, so I can charge less.  I know owners of these cars are price sensitive.  I'm also making an even less expensive log version for those that just need to replace the stock setup and want a slight upgrade.   That will be bolt-in with no mods.  That version I made before and was surprised how many wanted it.  I've made many designs over the years, including some out of 321, and Inconel.  Long tube runner and divided housing models too.  Design takes a lot of time and cutup parts to get right.  

That kit is the right idea, just more expensive than it needs to be.  I have to admit, they put more in it than you need, so there is room to screw up.

#10 DieHARDmitsu.

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Posted 21 February 2017 - 06:47 PM

If you have welding and fabrication experience, do it.
If you don't, just spend the extra $230 and get a bolt on header from ^^^him. It will be worth the headaches & disappointments you may meet in the long with trying to build your own.  Welding stainless scheduled pipes requires special rods, prep-work and proper weld. Your average mig welder will Not cut it. Cracks, miss alignment of pipes and leaks are all possibilities. I've built a couple of my own for 2jz and the 2.6l. Its time consuming...  
$550 is a good price.
Posted ImagePosted Image

#11 Chad

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Posted 25 February 2017 - 09:34 PM

I completed my newest revision:

http://www.starquest...howtopic=153233

I have about 30 hours and 3 prototypes in this to get the design to do what I wanted to do dimensionaly, fitment, and assembly wise.

#12 fang988

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Posted 26 February 2017 - 08:09 AM

What are the benefits of positioning the turbo flange way up there on your log manifold chad compared to the Treadstone Manifold that is in the middle?

#13 Chad

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Posted 26 February 2017 - 11:50 AM

Their design is a compromise in casting complexity, that is a very inexpensive design to mold and machine.  They may have had other motives, of which I'm unaware.  I can think of a few down sides to it, mostly that it puts the turbo too close to the runners.  In my pics, I had a t4 model shown with a small compressor housing, when I put my Borg Warner S372 on there, it  was much larger.  I think some members found this to be a problem on the treadstone, very large frame turbos don't allow you to clock the compressor housing the way that they wanted to because the housing hits the #1 runner.  I also know there were problems using the wastegate port, that the wastegate discharge ended up conflicting with the turbine outlet, it was either a design  oversight, or somone that designed it was crazy.  Having seen one of these manifolds, I do admit the runner dimensions and angles are well designed.  I replaced one on IvanG's car with a Garrett T-3/4 GT35 in 2008 with an equal length tuned length tube headder on his car.  He picked up 22 HP over the Treadstone.  It's not a bad manifold, but it does have some problems with installation.  I wonder if they ever put one in a starquest to see how it fit.

Another major design problem with the treadstone is the oil discharge of the turbo ends up being lower than the oil return port on the timing cover.  Those that just tried to run the returned oil uphill ended up wiping out the turbo oil seals or burning oil.  The only reliable solution was to add a return port to the oil pan, which isn't a fun task.  Our motors make too much oil pressure for domestic marketed turbos, so anything you do to slow the return causes oil seal stress/damage.

On my log designs, I place the turbo flange closer to stock centered on the #2 runner so people that already have hard pipes and exhaust mods can hopefully recycle parts with only slight modification when they change out the turbo/manifold.  I can just as easily center it on the manifold too though.

#14 Chad

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Posted 26 February 2017 - 06:40 PM

I update the for sale topic with pics of the T3 log and the stock replacement log, with pricing for both.

#15 fang988

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Posted 01 March 2017 - 02:53 PM

View PostChad, on 26 February 2017 - 11:50 AM, said:

I wonder if they ever put one in a starquest to see how it fit.

I am not sure if they did before the casting, but they do have a picture of the log installed on that webpage.

Posted Image

I have seen your post and I really like what you have. I still do not know if I want to go with the convenient route and pick up their log locally or not, but I do know I want one of your equal length runner mani-s some time in the future. I still have time to decide but thankyou for your wisdom sir.

Edited by fang988, 01 March 2017 - 03:00 PM.


#16 Funky Phil

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Posted 01 March 2017 - 03:43 PM

Thats the cast turbonetics ripoff
10.95@122mph MoFuggin stickshift! https://m.youtube.co...h?v=8Q01UKt5q4U

Posted Image

#17 superscan811

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Posted 28 March 2017 - 01:46 AM

Not a hater of 304 but I'd prefer it if they would have use 316. Stands up better to high heat.

Love the idea of a cast merge collector.

Going to make my own manifold more for the experience (ie: bragging rights) rather than anything else.

40mm ID, 316 stainless bends (Schedule 10)
1/2" flanges
Merge pipes are Schedule 40.

Parts...
Posted Image

Posted Image

Cheers.

#18 Chad

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Posted 28 March 2017 - 10:00 AM

I have used 316L in all of mine since 2005.  The L suffix is for its ultra low carbon content helps reduce carbide precipitation (intergranular corrosion).  Most grades are dual certified : 316/316L. This benifit is in addition to the slightly better elevated temp mechanical properties vs 304.

If you haven't worked with this material before, it "moves" more than almost any alloy while welding, it pulls and pushes a lot.  plan for that as you go.

#19 superscan811

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Posted 28 March 2017 - 07:43 PM

Thanks for the "heads up" on that. I'll be using a TIG with purge so hopefully the carbide issue won't rear its ugly head.

Cheers.





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